COVID-19 may have taken away the week-long Greene County Fair this year, but the pandemic could not take away the enthusiasm felt by dozens of area youths who were showing and selling their respective lambs and steers.

After the fair board agreed earlier this summer to cancel the 2020 fair due to safety and fiscal issues caused by COVID-19, local officials vowed that they would find a way to allow youths to show and sell their animals.

The 4-H Market Lamb and Steer Sale was eventually deemed “essential” by the state, so the Greene County Junior Livestock Committee was able to hold the traditional event at the county fairgrounds on Aug. 12.

In order to adhere to safety regulations and practice social distancing, the show and sale were moved to the outer rabbit barn and attendance was limited to invited buyers, and the youths showing and selling their animals wore face masks.

The show and sale were streamed live on the Greene County Fair Facebook page for those who normally attend but were unable to this year, and volunteers also accepted bids live via telephone.

Debbie Stephenson, a volunteer for the committee, said the event took a great deal of community effort to pull it together, but the effort was worth it.

“For this event to be even possible, it took everyone – community leaders and members, committee members, sponsors, businesses and organizations, volunteers and many more – to come together,” she said. “The committee sincerely thanks everyone involved in coordinating the event for making the show and sale such a huge success. And the kids appreciate it so much as well.”

The lamb and steer show was held throughout the afternoon and the animals were sold during the evening.

In the steer competition, Lila Perroots, 18, of Mt. Morris showed the overall grand champion. Her 1,425-pound steer, which was also selected as champion steer in the heavyweight division, was purchased by state Rep. Pam Snyder and Snyder Farm at $4.50 per pound, totaling $6,412.50.

Grace Woodling, 15, of Georgetown showed the overall reserve champion steer. Her 1,444-pound steer, which was also selected as reserve grand champion in the heavyweight division, was purchased by Ross Tractor Sales at $4.75 per pound for a total of $6,859.

In the middleweight division, Celia Parson, 13, of Graysville showed the champion, and her 1,360-pound steer was purchased by Scherich Simmons Farm at $7.50 per pound for a total of $10,200; and Brayden Mooney, 17, of Sycamore showed the reserve grand champion. His 1,322-pound steer was purchased by George R. Scull at $5.50 per pound for a total of $7,271.

And in the lightweight division, Emily Cooke, 16, of Waynesburg showed the champion, and her 1,210-pound steer was purchased by Washington Health System-Greene at $3 per pound for a total of $3,630; and Allexis Berdine, 13, of New Freeport showed the reserve champion, and her 1,198-pound steer was purchased by Hildreth Show Cattle at a cost of $4.75 per pound, totaling $5,690.50.

In the lamb competition, Allie Midla, 12, of Clarksville, showed the overall grand champion. Her 139-pound lamb, which was also selected as champion lamb in the middleweight division, was sold to Jacobs Excavating at a cost of $16 per pound, for a total of $2,224.

Kolby Smith, 17, of Waynesburg showed the overall reserve grand champion lamb. His 156-pound lamb, which was also selected as champion in the heavyweight division, was purchased by RM Manufacturing Sales at a cost of $15 per pound, for a total of $2,340.

Carly Whyte, 14, of Waynesburg showed the reserve champion heavyweight; her 148-pound lamb was purchased by Throckmorton Farm at a cost of $3 per pound, for a total of $444.

Grace Woodling, 15, of Georgetown showed the reserve champion middleweight; her 137-pound lamb was purchased by Professional Plumbing at $7 per pound totaling $959.

In the lightweight division, Emily Cooke, 16, of Waynesburg showed the champion, and her 106-pound lamb was purchased by Shale Pro Energy at $7.50 per pound totaling $795; and Daniel Brookover, 12, of Mt. Morris showed the reserve champion, and his 124-pound lamb was purchased by Crouse Farm at $4 per pound totaling $496.

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