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It was a Sunday in April, a church service in Brownsville. The pastor, Presbyterian minister R.M. Wallace, told his congregants, “It is the duty of all citizens to aid the constitutional authorities in maintaining the supremacy of the Constitution and the laws. Read more

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At the tail end of his first 100 days in office, President Franklin Roosevelt signed a measure that afforded working men and women the right to join unions of their own choosing. The act was revolutionary. No union leader took it more to heart than the United Mine Workers’ John L. Lewis. Read more

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In early 1861, folks gathered in Brownsville hoping to do their part to stop the slide toward Civil War. They elected a remarkable number of organizational vice presidents – 28 – and proclaimed their hope to “drop partisan feelings and prejudices.” Read more

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Wednesday’s inauguration comes at a time of national peril, prompting unparalleled precautions. The capital city will bristle with arms – troops at street corners and on the National Mall while Capitol Hill, the site of the inaugural, promises to be an armed fortress. Read more

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Because of the coronavirus and its restrictions, spending time outdoors has taken on new importance. In this spirit, here are some suggestions for history-minded walkers. Spending an hour (or so) rummaging through the past this way can be both edifying and relaxing. (Note: not a guarantee.) Read more

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For a generation or more, elected Republicans have been in the habit of waving the flag and proclaiming their love of country above all others. It turns out, however, that they don’t love their country. What’s more, they neither understand nor appreciate the country they claim to hold so dear. Read more